Join us Saturday, 12/15 with Frank LaMere as our guest

We’re very excited to announce that Frank LaMere will be joining us Saturday, December 15 at 10 Central, 11 Eastern for Talking Stick Radio.  You’re welcome to join in by calling (424)220-1870 or listen live by clicking on the highlighted link.  Archived version of the show is here:  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/talkingstickradio/2012/12/15/talking-stick-radio

Frank LaMere, a member of the Winnebago Tribe, is a noted social and political activist from South Sioux City, Nebraska. He has held numerous Nebraska Democratic Party offices and served on the Democratic National Committee from 1996 until 2009.  Mr. LaMere has attended the last seven Democratic National Conventions including the most recent one in Charlotte, North Carolina, and chaired the Native American Caucus meetings of the conventions in 2004 and 2008.  He had the distinction of casting his vote as a super delegate for Barack Obama in 2008 and credits The Reverend Jesse Jackson for inspiring his political efforts that he began in 1987.

Frank is generally regarded as the architect of the movement to stop the illegal flow of alcohol from Whiteclay, Nebraska onto the dry Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, work which has led to his arrest on two occasions and which is chronicled in the award-winning documentary The Battle For Whiteclay. He has served on numerous boards and commissions and has been honored for his efforts on many fronts.  He was the recipient of the 2001 Peacemaker of the Year award given by the Nebraskans For Peace, the 2011 War Eagle Human Rights Award from the City of Sioux City and was recognized through legislative Resolution 440 from the Nebraska Unicameral for his work with Native people.

Frank LaMere is semi-retired but continues as a consultant developing the Four Directions Community Center in Sioux City, Iowa and working with Ho-Chunk Inc., the economic development arm of the Winnebago Tribe.  Frank is the father of four and the grandfather of nine and is married to Cynthia, a member of the Yankton Sioux Tribe.

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